20 April 2023

Vol 5, Issue 8

 

What’s next for school-based testing? Looking forward to the 2023-24 school year.

First time seeing this newsletter? You can subscribe here.

An image of a beautifully embroidered human head with flowers and bright colors on a bright pink background

The Learning Network Courses. With Drs. Kira and Tona.

An illustration of nurse Liz Pray of Moses Lake School District

Stories you might have missed over spring break. Spotlight and news.

People walking down a city street, some wearing masks.

COVID-19 in Washington. Plus a new variant to watch.

COVID-19 News. What you need to know.

An illustration of nurse Liz Pray of Moses Lake School District

What’s next for school-based testing? Looking forward to the 2023-24 school year. 

Join us on Thursday, May 18th from 10-11am for the last statewide Learning Network event

What will COVID-19 management look like as we transition to a period of pandemic recovery?

What resources can schools count on next fall to support school-based testing?

Get answers to these questions and more directly from DOH and OSPI leaders during the Learning Network event on May 18th.

Our guest speakers will discuss:

  • Resources available next year to support school-based COVID-19 testing
  • DOH guidance updates and how these will be communicated
  • The development of a new respiratory disease dashboard
  • A centralized website that will support ongoing communication between DOH and schools and maintain resources   

The event will feature a moderated Q&A so participants can ask their questions about the future of COVID-19 management. Participants will get key takeaways about DOH support that will help them get ahead of planning for next school year.

Speakers include: 

  • Dr. Tao Kwan Gett, Chief Science Officer, Washington State Department of Health
  • Lacy Fehrenbach, Chief of Prevention, Washington State Department of Health
  • Michaela Miller, Deputy Superintendent, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
  • Kimberly Sanchez, Education Engagement Director, Washington State Department of Health
  • Michelle Chung, School Testing Supervisor, Washington State Department of Health
  • Samantha Rice, K-12 School Outbreak and Guidance Epidemiologist, Washington State Department of Health
  • Lillian Manahan, Surveillance Epidemiologist, Washington State Department of Health

Additional speakers and topics may be added as we get closer to the event. Stay tuned for more information!

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An image of a beautifully embroidered human head with flowers and bright colors on a bright pink background

The Learning Network Courses. With Drs. Kira and Tona.

Portraits from left to right of Drs. Mauseth and McGuire.

Dr. Kira Mauseth & Dr. Tona McGuire

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An illustration of nurse Liz Pray of Moses Lake School District

Stories you might have missed over spring break. Spotlight and news.

Spotlight on Moses Lake School District

Nurse Liz Pray pushed for school-based testing to expand access for those in the community who needed it most.

The mask order for healthcare settings has ended

Although this emergency countermeasure has ended, other requirements related to infection prevention and worker protection will remain in place.

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People walking down a city street, some wearing masks.

COVID-19 in Washington. Plus a new variant to watch.

Know your COVID-19 community levels. Are you low, medium, or high?

Recommendations:

  • Masking and screening testing are recommended best practices when your community level is high.
  • Masking is recommended for high-risk individuals when your community level is medium or high.
  • View the map here.
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A COVID-19 virus on a blue background with the words: New Omicron Subvariants
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COVID-19 NEWS

You’re less likely to get long COVID after a second infection than a first

NPR, 14 April 2023. Among the adults in the survey, 4% reported long COVID symptoms persisting at least four weeks after their first infection, the survey found. In contrast, just 2.4% of those who hadn’t developed lingering health problems after their first infection reported ongoing symptoms after their second case.

Students are chronically absent across the country. COVID seems to have made it worse

ABC News, 12 April 2023. From kindergarteners to high school seniors, chronic absenteeism persists around the country, fueled in part by disruptions from the spread of COVID-19 in the last three years, government data shows. In some places, repeated absences are getting much worse.

‘Arcturus,’ a COVID variant sweeping India, is now in the U.S., the CDC says—and it’s coming in hot. What it means for the future of the pandemic

Fortune, 14 April 2023.  In the U.S., levels of XBB.1.16 are highest in the south central region, where they are projected to represent more than 20% of cases, and on the West Coast, where they hover around 10%, according to the CDC. They’re lowest in the Northeast, where they’re estimated to fuel less than 2.5% of cases.

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